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ProArt Epoxy Resin Description

ProMarine’s ProArt Epoxy Resin is specially formulated for artisans and crafters. Designed for quicker mixing and longer working times; ProArt protects delicate artwork with a crystal-clear hard-shell finish. Versatile ProArt may be used to create, seal and protect a wide variety of projects including drawings, paintings, photography, woodworking, and more with a durable industry-leading UV-resistant coating that resists moisture, corrosion, and handling wear-and-tear.

Epoxy Resin Advisory Notes:

  • We strongly recommend that All of these instructions are thoroughly read BEFORE working with epoxy resin.
  • This product is not intended to be used with, or over any, type of oil-based products.
  • This product is not intended for outdoor use.
  • All epoxy has natural variations in color/tint, which may be accented by the color of the surface to which the epoxy is applied. White surfaces, for instance, are always the most challenging in terms of highlighting epoxy hue variations.

Guide Contents:

  1. Before You Begin
  • Epoxy Resin Coverage Calculations
  • Optimal Working Conditions
  • Safety
  • Surface Preparation
  1. Measuring & Mixing – Tools & Tips
  2. Application & Curing
    • Seal Coat
    • Flood Coat
    • Removing Air Bubbles
    • Curing
    • Heat Resistance
    1. Before You Begin

    Surface Coverage – We offer an epoxy resin coverage calculator to help determine how much epoxy you will need based upon the square footage of the surface you will be working with. To access the calculator click HERE 

    Working Conditions/Temperature – Optimal product working temperature is 75-85F. The product must be stored, mixed, applied, and cured for 72 hours at 75-85F. THIS IS A REQUIREMENT to achieve desired results. If the product has been exposed to cold temperatures; acclimate by placing jugs in a warm water bath. Climate controlled conditions are required to properly work with epoxy to control both temperature and humidity levels – which affect both working time and proper curing.

    Safety – This product has no Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs); however, we recommend working with epoxy resin in a well-ventilated area. We also recommend protective eyewear and gloves when working with the product. NOTE: Some people may be more sensitive to epoxy than others – and may wish to wear a ventilator when using the product. For skin contact, wash with soap and warm water. If the epoxy comes in contact with eyes – do not rub – and flush with water for 15 minutes repeatedly. If irritation persists, seek medical attention immediately. Please contact us for a Materials Safety Data Sheet. (MSDS)

    Surface Preparation – The project surface should be free of any dirt, dust, oils, or grease. Denatured alcohol or acetone can be used to clean the surface with a lint-free rag. Your surface should be level so the epoxy can self-level. The room you are working in should be clean, dry, dust and insect-free. Settling dust can cause imperfections on the surface of the epoxy as it is curing.

    1. Measuring and Mixing – Tools & Tips

    ProArt’s two-part epoxy resin formula was created specifically for intricate art and craft projects. The mixing ratio is a simple-to-use 1-to-1 volume of resin to hardener and is designed to be self-leveling for easy application. ProArt works with a variety of substrates such as wood, canvas, metal, and plastics, and mixes well with pigments like powdered and liquid tints and dyes for enhancing works of art.

    Measuring – It is imperative that the product is measured as accurately as possible and mixed thoroughly. Measure 1-part RESIN to 1-part HARDENER by liquid volume (not weight). Do NOT vary this ratio.

    NOTE: We do not recommend mixing a combined total of more than 1 gallon at a time.

    MixingAdd Hardener then Resin to a mixing container with about 30% greater capacity than the amount of product you are mixing.

    The goal of mixing is a thorough combination of the two parts. (It helps some people to think of a cake batter mix.) In order to obtain a uniform consistency after mixing – scraping the sides & bottom of the container during mixing is required.

    Mix with a flat bottom stir stick or silicon spatula being sure to scrape the sides and bottom of the container multiple times as you mix. Do not beat or whip the epoxy. A folding motion combined with stirring and scraping the mixing vessel sides will allow you to thoroughly combine the two parts. Mix time varies by the volume of product being mixed. ProArt epoxy quantities of 64-128 ounces typically require 5-8 minutes – use a timer.

    Do not mix any longer than 8-10 minutes. Over mixing the epoxy will cause it to cure quickly in the mixing cup. The product will also get hot and possibly smoke. If you are mixing several batches of epoxy, be sure to use a new, clean container every time.

    • Pro Tip – If you are new to using epoxy, we recommend starting your mixing process with small batches until you get the hang of it. Epoxy is a time-sensitive product and needs to be mixed and poured before the epoxy begins to cure. Epoxy cures when the two components are mixed in the correct ratio. The process is an exothermic reaction (gives off heat). We do not advise mixing more than 1 gallon of combined product at a time. If the product is mixed and applied per these directions premature curing can be avoided.
    • Factors that may cause epoxy resin premature curing are:
      • Over-vigorous mixing – mix by hand (don’t whip)
      • Mixing for too many minutes
      • Allowing epoxy to sit in the mixing vessel too long after mixing
      • Pouring too deep a layer – the epoxy is designed for 1/8″ thick flood coats with a maximum of 1/4″ depth

    Why is this happening? As soon as the two parts of epoxy and resin are combined, the exothermic reaction that leads to eventual curing, begins. The process of pouring the mixture onto a surface – spreads out the epoxy – so it may undergo its reaction as expected. When the mixture is confined – as in a mixing vessel – the reaction is intensified and will occur in a much faster and concentrated manner. This leads to excessive heat and possibly smoking. This also occurs during a deep pour.

    III. Application & Curing

    Seal Coat

    A seal coat is a small batch of epoxy that is typically brushed on in a thin layer to seal a porous surface (hardwood, barn wood, knotty wood, etc.). The seal coat minimizes the release of air (bubbles) from the surface into the flood (or finish) coat. (see below). ProMarine epoxy resin is used for both seal coats and flood coats.

    NOTES: 

    • Do Not use the product over any oil-based or unknown coatings
    • Aged and kiln-dried porous woods may need multiple seal coats – it is not uncommon for as many as 3 seal coats to be used on these surfaces
    • You may skip the seal coat when pouring the epoxy on a non-porous surface

    To apply a seal coat, start on one end of the artwork and pour the resin the full length of the surface, zigzagging as you go. Then use a rubber squeegee, spatula, or a foam brush to move the resin around – covering the entire surface in an even coat. As epoxy cures rather rapidly in the container, it is necessary to paint the seal coat on quickly; or mix up small amounts as you apply to avoid curing in the container while you are working.

    Air Bubbles – Once the entire surface has been covered with a seal coat, the process of releasing/removing air bubbles may begin. The best tool for removing bubbles is a small propane torch. (A heat gun may also be used but takes a bit more practice to manipulate as easily and effectively as a torch.) Hold the flame approximately 6 to 10 inches away from the tabletop and quickly sweep across the entire surface using a waving motion. The heat from the torch/gun will allow for the release of the air bubbles.

    NOTE: it is best to intermittently check the surface for bubbles for up to an hour using a torch (or heat gun) as needed.

    Once the entire surface is sealed, wait 4-6 hours before applying the flood coat. If the seal is allowed to cure, just lightly sand the surface (320-grit) and wipe clean with a drop of denatured alcohol or acetone before flooding – to ensure adhesion of the next coat.

    The Flood/Finish Coat

    To apply the flood coat, start on one end and pour the resin the entire length of the surface, zigzagging as you go. After you are finished pouring your mixture, set the container down. DO NOT SCRAPE ANYTHING OUT OF THE MIXING BUCKET.  Because you are pouring about three times the amount of product you did with the seal coat, the material will immediately start to flow out. However, you may still want to use a rubber squeegee or foam brush to help guide the material around. A true flood coat will require minimal manipulation.

    The product is designed for 1/8″ thick pours but people often pour up to 1/4″ thick at a time. After 4 hours you can pour another layer directly onto the previous layer. If it has been more than 10 hours the previous layer should be lightly sanded (200-300 grit) and wiped clean with a drop of denatured alcohol or acetone before pouring your next layer.

    Edges and Drips – The flood coat can be allowed to run over the edges of artwork which will create a coating on the vertical edges. These vertical edge coatings will not be as thick as the top surface coating; so, manipulation with a brush to keep the layer even is suggested. Drips will form underneath the edge, which can be sanded off once the epoxy has cured. Or, if you catch the epoxy when still soft during the curing process, drips may be cut or scraped off.

    Air Bubbles – Once the entire surface has been covered with a flood coat, the process of releasing/removing air bubbles may begin. The best tool for removing bubbles is a small propane torch. (A heat gun may also be used but takes a bit more practice to manipulate as easily and effectively as a torch.) Hold the flame approximately 6 to 10 inches away from the artwork and quickly sweep across the entire surface using a waving motion. The heat from the torch/gun will allow for the release of the air bubbles.

    NOTE: it is best to intermittently check the surface for bubbles for up to an hour using a torch (or heat gun) as needed.

    Curing – After applying the final coat, the epoxy resin surface should be kept in a clean, dust-free environment at a minimum of 75-80° F degrees for 72 hours.

    Heat Resistance – The heat resistance once fully cured is 120 degrees Fahrenheit /57 degrees Celsius. The use of coasters and place mats is recommended to protect tabletop surfaces and also to reduce heat transfer.

    ProMarine Supplies

    Welcome to the ProMarine Supplies Blog. Here we hope to provide you with inspiration and insight into epoxy resin products, the latest crafting trends, exciting projects, and so much more!

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